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2018 CONFERENCE NEWS

Plans for the CNFC’s 2018 Conference at the University of Toronto are well underway! Featuring Kamal Al- Solaylee, Lee Maracle, Dinty Moore, Carol Off, Evany Rosen, Naben Ruthnum, Tanya Talaga, and more, with workshops, interviews, and panels on topics ranging from writing humour to grappling with difficult material, this weekend of lively conversation and craft will offer plenty of prompts to writers of all levels. The conference kicks off at 2 pm on Friday, May 4, with a publishing panel…

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CNF tip of the day: lyric essay

Lyric Essay A lyric essay uses the techniques of poetry, including compression, sound play, white space, formal innovation, non-linear narrative, and juxtaposition to explore an idea or an experience in the writer’s life. Lyric essays may be structured as collage or mosaic, as braided or woven narratives, as “flash” snapshots, or wedged within the carapace of other forms such as instruction manuals, rejection letters, lists, or maps, and they may also make use of images. They often rely on research…

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CNF tip of the day: memoir

Memoir A memoir is an attempt to make artful sense of some aspect or period of the author’s life. The facts may be unusual or traumatic, or they may be ordinary and unremarkable. “What happened” is less important in memoir than the clarity, grace, or originality of the writer’s style and the honest pursuit of self-knowledge. As V.S. Pritchett said, “It’s all in the art. You get no credit for living.” A few examples Joan Didion: “Goodbye to All That.”…

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Listen to “Who’s Afraid of the Personal Essay” workshop with Andreas Schroeder

On May 6, 2017, CNFC founding member Andreas Schroeder gave a much-anticipated workshop about the personal essay as part of the organization’s annual conference. An audio recording of this workshop is now available for all CNFC members. Workshop description: The personal essay is one of the most flexible forms in creative nonfiction. It can include elements of every other genre there is. It can be lyrical, rhetorical, formal, or informal. Its apparent looseness (“a sally through a mazy mind,” as…

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